CBC News Interview: Stepping back but not down: How the Queen is gradually shifting duties to the next generation

Queen Elizabeth II investing Prince Charles as Prince of Wales in 1969.

I discussed Queen Elizabeth II with CBC News this past week in the context of her decision to observe the Remembrance Sunday ceremonies in London with Prince Philip while their son Charles, the Prince of Wales, laid the wreath that the Queen usually places herself.

Here’s an excerpt from the interview:

“The Queen appears to view her position as a lifelong commitment to her people,” says Carolyn Harris, a Toronto-based royal author and historian whose book Raising Royalty: 1,000 Years of Royal Parenting was released earlier this year.

“At the age of 21, she stated that she would devote her whole life whether it was long or short to the service of her people and she received a religious coronation ceremony in 1953 that emphasized this lifelong commitment.”

Click here to read “Stepping back but not down: How the Queen is gradually shifting duties to the next generation”

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My January-February 2018 course at University of Toronto School of Continuing Studies: Family Life from Medieval to Modern Times

On Wednesday afternoons in January and February 2018, I will be teaching an eight week history course about Family Life from Medieval to Modern Times.

Click here for more information and to register.

Course Description:

Our views on marriage and childrearing would seem very strange to families of past centuries. We’ll see the influence of romanticism on the current understanding of family life, the changing role of grandparents in relation to family traditions, and the emergence of a distinct children’s culture including the birth of children’s literature, due in part to the expansion of formal education. Join us for a look at marriage and parenting customs and advice through the centuries, and the surprising influence of history on family life today.
Learning Outcomes:
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Updated Canadian Encyclopedia Article: Prince Charles (HRH The Prince of Wales)

The Prince of Wales

I have updated my article about Prince Charles in the Canadian Encyclopedia to include the 2017 tour of Nunavut, Ontario and the National Capital region in honour of the 15oth anniversary of Canada’s Confederation.

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

“Charles and Camilla spent Canada Day in the National Capital Region. Charles first met with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and then was invested as Extraordinary Companion of the Order of Canada. He later made a speech on Parliament Hill, which included extensive remarks in French and a warm tribute to Governor General David Johnston, whose term ends in September 2017. During their time in the National Capital Region, the royal couple also helped open the Canadian History Hall at the Canadian Museum of History, unveiled the Queen’s Entrance at Rideau Hall and reopened the newly renovated National Arts Centre.”

Click here to read Prince Charles (HRH The Prince of Wales) in the Canadian Encyclopedia.

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CBC News Network Interview: The Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall Visit Prince Edward County

Prince Charles tours the Wellington Farmer’s Market in Ontario, Friday June 30, 2017.
[Photo credit: Peter J. Thompson]

I discussed the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall’s visit to Prince Edward County on the CBC News Network this afternoon including Prince Charles’s interest in organic farming, the first royal walkabout in Canada in 1939 and the history of Queen Elizabeth II’s Canadian tours

Click here to watch: “Carolyn Harris interview – Live coverage of royal tour on CBC News Network”

I am also quoted in the CBC article “Retired soldier takes to life on the farm, with help from Prince Charles”

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CBC News Interview: Is Prince Charles misunderstood?

The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall

I discussed the Prince of Wales’s reputation and philanthropy with Janet Davison at CBC News, in advance of his tour of Canada with the Duchess of Cornwall, which will include Nunavut, Prince Edward County and Ottawa for the 150th anniversary of Canada’s Confederation. Here’s an excerpt from the interview:

“In Canada, there’s also a feeling the public perception of Charles has been changing. “I have the sense that it’s much more positive now than it has been in the past,” says Carolyn Harris, a Toronto-based author and royal historian.

“Some of the causes Prince Charles has been engaging with have become very topical and raised the profile of these tours,” says Harris, whose book Raising Royalty: 1,000 Years of Royal Parenting was recently published.”

Click here to read “Is Prince Charles Misunderstood at CBC News”

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Maclean’s Interview: Canadians adore Queen Elizabeth. Her son? Not so much

The investiture of Prince Charles as Prince of Wales at Caenarvon Castle in 1969

My recent interview in Maclean’s Magazine concerns how Queen Elizabeth II and her son Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales, are perceived in Canada. Canadians turning 100 are eligible to receive birthday greetings from the monarch. As journalist Aaron Hutchins and I discussed, the current generation of Canadian centenarians would prefer to receive congratulations from the current Queen rather than her successor for a variety of reasons including the shared experience of the Second World War.

Click here to read “Canadians adore Queen Elizabeth. Her son? Not so much” in Maclean’s Magazine

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CBC News Interview: ‘Times have changed’: Why Prince Harry’s girlfriend Meghan Markle could fit right in with the Royal Family

Prince Harry at the Invictus Games in London, 2014

My latest conversation with CBC News about Prince Harry and his relationship with actress Meghan Markle.

Here’s an excerpt from the interview:

“When Charles married again in 2005, it was to Camilla Parker Bowles, who had been involved with Charles for years and divorced from her first husband a decade earlier.

“That’s been widely seen as a softening of attitudes toward members of the Royal Family marrying divorcees,” says Harris.

Other royal families in Europe are “even more relaxed about the whole question of who’s a suitable spouse for royalty,” says Harris, noting, for example, that Crown Prince Haakon of Norway married a single mother.

Harris, whose book Raising Royalty: 1,000 years of Royal Parenting was just released, sees whomever Harry marries as being part of a streamlined Royal Family, a move that was signalled particularly in the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee celebrations in 2012.”

Click here to read “‘Times have changed’: Why Prince Harry’s girlfriend Meghan Markle could fit right in with the Royal Family” at CBC.ca

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Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting now available for purchase

My 3rd book, Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting, has been published by Dundurn Press in Canada. (The USA and UK release date is May 2).

Click here to purchase your copy of Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting

How royal parents dealt with raising their children over the past thousand years, from keeping Vikings at bay to fending off paparazzi.

William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, are setting trends for millions of parents around the world. The upbringing of their children, Prince George and Princess Charlotte, is the focus of intense popular scrutiny. Royalty have always raised their children in the public eye and attracted praise or criticism according to parenting standards of their day.

Royal parents have faced unique challenges and held unique privileges. In medieval times, raising an heir often meant raising a rival, and monarchs sometimes faced their grown children on the battlefield. Conversely, kings and queens who lost their thrones in wars or popular revolutions often found solace in time spent with their children. In modern times, royal duties and overseas tours have often separated young princes and princesses from their parents, a circumstance that is slowly changing with the current generation of royalty.

Click here to purchase your copy of Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting

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The Table of Contents for Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting

The Table of Contents of my forthcoming book, Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting is now available online:

Table of Contents

Introduction  Raising a Royal Child

1     Edgar “the Peaceable” (c. 943-75) and Elfrida of Northampton (c. 945-1001)
2     William “the Conqueror” (c. 1028-87) and Matilda of Flanders (c. 1031-83)

Genealogical chart depicting King Henry II of England and his children

3     Henry II (1133-89) and Eleanor of Aquitaine (c. 1124-1204)
4     Henry III (1207-72) and Eleanor of Provence (c. 1223-91)
5     Edward III (1312-77) and Philippa of Hainault (1314-69)
6     Richard III (1452-85) and Anne Neville (1456-85)

Charles I, Henrietta Maria and their two eldest children

7     Ferdinand II of Aragon (1452-1516) and Isabella I of Castile (1451-1504)
8     Henry VIII (1491-1547) and Catherine of Aragon (1485-1536)
9     Frederick V, Elector Palatine (1596-1632) and Elizabeth of England and Scotland (1596-1662)
10    Charles I (1600-49) and Henrietta Maria of France (1609-69)
11    Peter I “the Great” of Russia (1672-1725) and Catherine I (1684-1727)
12    Anne (1665-1714) and George of Denmark (1653-1708)
13    George II (1683-1760) and Caroline of Ansbach (1683-1737)

Nicholas and Alexandra present their daughter, Olga to Queen Victoria

14    Louis XVI of France (1754-93) and Marie Antoinette of Austria (1755-93)
15    Victoria (1819-1901) and Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (1819-61)
16    Nicholas II of Russia (1868-1918) and Alexandra of Hesse-Darmstadt (1872-1918)
17    Juliana of the Netherlands (1909-2004) and Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld (1911-2004)
18    Elizabeth II (1926-) and Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark (1921-)
19    Prince Charles (1948-) and Lady Diana Spencer (1961-97)  20    Prince William (1982-) and Catherine Middleton (1982-)

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and their children, Prince George and Princess Charlotte arrive in Canada

Epilogue    The Future of the Royal Nursery

Acknowledgements
Notes
Further Reading
Index

Click here to pre-order your copy of Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting

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Advance Reader Reviews of Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting

Readers who received advance review copies of my forthcoming book, Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting are sharing their reviews on goodreads. Raising Royalty will be published by Dundurn Press in Canada in April 2017 and in the USA and UK in May 2017.

Here are excerpts from some of the reader reviews:

“Raising Royalty is a comprehensive study of how…Kings and Queens have raised their children. Twenty families with their widely varying parenting approaches from Anglo-Saxon times to the present are studied.
While the book is a thoroughly researched subject by a scholar, it is a joy to read. It provides a clear picture of how parenting in the rarefied atmosphere of castles and palaces has evolved and, perhaps more importantly, why. Boys were brought up to fight and rule, and girls for dynastic/political marriages. Princes and princesses had no choice one thousand years ago and, one also sympathizes, today their futures are still fixed in stone but with a little more leeway.
Carolyn Harris, the author, has done an excellent job of writing this book for general readership and it will open eyes with the detail and surprises. Recommended for history buffs and royal watchers.” — Julie Ferguson

“I was expecting the book to be entirely be about English royalty, but was pleased to find that it covered enough of Europe to give it some diversity.
Filled with a lot of interesting facts and written in a way that held my attention.
Both well researched and written.” — MissyLynne

“I was expecting a list of “advice” and “lessons” and was pleasantly surprised.
Ms. Harris presents a HUGE amount of history in this book and her skill at writing in a way that keeps the reader engaged and interested is refreshing.
Anyone with any interest in royal families will love this book. It’s a great read. ” — Michelle Griswold

Click here to view all reader reviews for Raising Royalty on goodreads

Click here to pre-order your copy of Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting

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