CBC News Interview: The Queen at 90: Why Elizabeth has so many birthdays

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh leaving the Royal York hotel in Toronto on a tour of Canada in 2010.

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh leaving the Royal York hotel in Toronto on a tour of Canada in 2010.

The Queen turns 90 today but the royal birthday celebrations will continue for the next few months as the monarch marks her official birthday in the United Kingdom in June and has special 90th birthday celebrations in May. Various Commonwealth realms celebrate the Queen’s birthday on different dates with Canada observing the occasion on the Victoria Day holiday in May.

I discussed the Queen’s many birthdays with Janet Davison at CBC News.

Click here to read The Queen at 90: Why Elizabeth has so many birthdays at CBC.ca

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CBC News Interview: The Queen at 90: Why it’s more than just a celebration of Elizabeth’s birthday

The Queen reading the throne speech at the 2012 State Opening of Parliament

The Queen turns 90 on April 21 and public celebrations will continue in May and June in the United Kingdom and Commonwealth. I discussed the significance of the Queen’s 90th birthday with Janet Davison at CBC.ca.

Click here to read the interview “The Queen at 90: Why it’s more than just a celebration of Elizabeth’s birthday” at CBC.ca

I will be appearing on TV and radio throughout the day on April 21 to discuss the Queen at 90. Here is my schedule of interviews:

6am-8am: CBC News Network

1pm: CTV News Channel

2:30pm-6:30pm CBC syndicated radio

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Postmedia Interview: Queen Elizabeth’s top 10 moments in Canada

Queen in Canada 1959 The Queen celebrates her 90th birthday this month, an opportunity to look back on her long reign, which includes twenty-two tours of Canada. I discussed the 1959 royal tour by the Queen and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh with Kate Bueckert at postmedia and I am quoted in the article “Queen Elizabeth’s top ten moments in Canada,” which appears in the Toronto Sun and other postmedia news outlets.

The 1959 royal tour was the Queen’s longest tour of Canada, the last whistle-stop tour where the royal couple crossed the country by train. The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh spent six and half weeks in Canada, visiting every province and territory of the time. Subsequent royal tours were shorter, focusing on specific regions of the country, an approach that continues to the present day.

Canadians responded to the 1959 royal tour with enthusiasm and large crowds greeted the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh at various stops along the tour, including the province of Quebec, where the Queen would encounter protesters just five years later in 1964. The occasional critical voice in the Canadian media met with strong disagreement by senior political figures and members of the public. When CBC journalist Joyce Davidson stated, “We’re still annoyed at still being dependent on a monarchy,” Nathan Phillips, Mayor of Toronto was quick to declare “[Davidson] doesn’t represent Canadians or the people of Toronto.”

Over the course of the royal couple’s itinerary, the Duke of Edinburgh assumed a greater public role as the Queen discovered that she was expecting Prince Andrew and needed time to rest within her busy schedule. (The Queen’s pregnancy was not public knowledge during the tour though Canadian Prime Minister Diefenbaker was one of the first be informed). Prince Philip performed solo engagements including a speech to the Canadian Medical Association at the Royal York hotel in Toronto where he encouraged Canadians to improve their level of physical fitness.

The 1959 royal tour remains one of the Queen’s most historically significant tours of Canada. The Queen opened the St. Lawrence Seaway as Queen of Canada with American President Dwight Eisenhower and had the opportunity to meet with Canadians from across and the country and various walks of life.

Click here to read Queen Elizabeth’s top 10 moments in Canada in The Toronto Sun 

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh in Canada in 2010

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh in Canada in 2010

For more about the Queen in Canada, see my 2012 Diamond Jubilee series of articles:

1) The Young Queen of Canada

2) The Controversial Queen of Canada

3) The Celebrity Queen of Canada

4) The Jubilee Queen of Canada

 

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New Canadian Encyclopedia Article: The Crown in Canada

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge in Canada in 2011

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge in Canada in 2011

My latest article in the Canadian Encyclopedia discusses the Crown in Canada.

In Canada, a constitutional monarchy, the Crown is the source of non-partisan sovereign authority and an integral part of the legislative, executive and judicial powers that govern the country. Under Canada’s system of responsible government (or democracy), the Crown performs each of these functions on the binding advice, or through the actions of, members of parliament, ministers, or judges.

Click here to read my article on the Crown in the Canadian Encyclopedia.

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New Canadian Encyclopedia Article: Letters Patent, 1947

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth at Toronto City Hall in 1939

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth at Toronto City Hall during their 1939 Canadian tour

My recent article in the Canadian Encyclopedia discussed the Letters Patent, 1947.

The Letters Patent Constituting the Office of Governor General and Commander-in-Chief of Canada, usually shortened to Letters Patent, 1947, was an edict issued by King George VI that expanded the role of the governor general, allowing him or her to exercise prerogatives of the sovereign. While Letters Patent delegated Crown prerogatives to the governor general, the sovereign remains Head of State.

Click here to read Letters Patent, 1947 in the Canadian Encyclopedia

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New Canadian Encyclopedia Article: Sovereign

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh leaving the Royal York hotel in Toronto on a tour of Canada in 2010.

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh leaving the Royal York hotel in Toronto on a tour of Canada in 2010.

My latest article in the Canadian Encyclopedia discusses the role of the sovereign in Canada’s government.

Under Canada’s constitutional monarchy, the sovereign is head of state, the legal foundation of the executive branch of government and one part of Parliament — along with the Senate and House of Commons. The current sovereign of Canada is Queen Elizabeth II.

Click here to read my article on the Sovereign in the Canadian Encyclopedia.

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Ms. Suffragette Interview: Queen Victoria’s Opposition to Women’s Suffrage

Queen Victoria at the time of her Diamond Jubilee in 1897

Queen Victoria at the time of her Diamond Jubilee in 1897

I discussed the campaign for women’s suffrage in 19th and early 20th century Britain and Canada with Ms. Suffragette, five University of Alberta Law Students who are blogging about the women’s suffrage movement.

In the interview, I discuss the differences between “suffragists” and “suffragettes” and how they were perceived differently over the course of the campaign for women to receive the vote.

I also discuss Queen Victoria’s opposition to women’s suffrage. Although Queen Victoria was the Head of State, she held traditional views about separate spheres for men and women and opposed women voting and running for public office. In contrast, her daughters were more sympathetic to women of all social backgrounds assuming a greater role in public life and supported philanthropic endeavors that improved women’s lives. Queen Victoria’s fourth daughter Princess Louise quietly received suffragists and was connected to prominent figures in the women’s suffrage movement.

Click here to read: “What exactly are “suffragettes”, and Why Did Queen Victoria Hate Them?” on the Ms. Suffragette blog

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My 3rd Book: Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting is now available for pre-order

I am excited to announce that my 3rd book, Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting will be published by Dundurn Press on April 8, 2017.

The book examines How twenty-five sets of royal parents raised their children over the past thousand years, from keeping the Vikings at bay to fending off paparazzi.

William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, are setting trends for millions of parents around the world. The upbringing of their two children, Prince George and Princess Charlotte, is the focus of intense popular scrutiny. Royalty have always raised their children in the public eye and attracted praise or criticism according to parenting standards of their day.

Royal parents have always faced unique privileges and challenges. In medieval times, raising an heir often meant raising a rival, and monarchs sometimes faced their grown children on the battlefield. Kings and queens who lost their thrones through wars or popular revolutions found solace in time spent with their children. In modern times, royal duties and overseas tours have often separated young princes and princesses from their parents, a circumstance that is slowly changing with the current generation of royalty.

The book is currently available for pre-order from Indigo, Amazon and other booksellers.

Click here to pre-order Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting from Amazon.ca

My other books also available from Amazon:

Magna Carta and Its Gifts to Canada: Democracy, Law, and Human Rights

Queenship and Revolution in Early Modern Europe: Henrietta Maria and Marie Antoinette

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New Canadian Encyclopedia Article: Monarchism

Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh in Canada in 2010

Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh in Canada in 2010

My latest article in the Canadian Encyclopedia is about Monarchism in Canadian history, politics and culture. I discuss the role of monarchism in Canada’s Confederation, monarchist themes in Canadian literature, monarchist societies active in modern day Canada and critiques of monarchism. I also compare attitudes toward the monarchy in Canada with monarchism in other Commonwealth realms.

Click here to read Monarchism in the Canadian Encyclopedia

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My January-February 2016 course: Artists and Their Royal Patrons

800px-Henrietta_Maria_and_Charles_I In January and February 2016, I will be teaching an eight week course on Wednesday afternoons about Artists and Their Royal Patrons at the University of Toronto School of Continuing Studies. Click here to register

For centuries, artists sought out royal patrons to advance their careers. European monarchs were eager to fill their courts with artists to demonstrate their own acumen and prestige. Through lectures, images and discussions, Carolyn Harris will lead you through a lively exploration of the relations between great artists and their royal patrons. These include Hans Holbein and Henry VIII, Leonardo da Vinci and François I, Anthony van Dyck and Charles I, Peter Paul Rubens and Marie de Medici, and Élisabeth Vigée-LeBrun and Marie Antoinette. We will look at Catherine the Great, who helped found the Hermitage Museum, and Queen Elizabeth II, who is appreciated as a “curator monarch” for her part in opening the British Royal Collection to the public. You’ll learn more about the collaboration and tension between royalty and artists that produced some of Europe’s most famous works of art and established collections now featured in great museums around the world.

Click here for more information and to register

 

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