Interview: What will royal Baby Cambridge No. 2 be named?

Prince George and the Duchess of Cambridge at the polo match. Photo credit: Splash news

Prince George and the Duchess of Cambridge at a polo match. Photo credit: Splash news

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s second child is due later this month and speculation continues regarding possible names. My most recent interview about the history of royal baby names discusses some of the possible contenders including Arthur, which is one of Prince William’s middle names and Charlotte, which has a royal pedigree and has been used by the Middleton family.  The article also mentions my forthcoming book, Magna Carta and Its Gifts to Canada: Democracy, Law, and Human Rights

Click here to read What will royal Baby Cambridge No. 2 be named?

CBC Interview: Royal baby names: What’s likely for William and Kate’s 2nd child?

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and their son, Prince George

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and their son, Prince George

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge – William and Kate – are expecting their second child this month. I discussed possible royal baby names with Janet Davison at CBC.ca. There are numerous predictions that “Alice” will be chosen for a girl. Alice was one of Queen Victoria’s favourite names for girls and the name of a number of her descendants including Prince Philip’s mother. I also discuss the impact of royalty on baby name choices in Canada, including the reason “Louise” and “Lorne” became popular Canadian baby names by the early twentieth century.

Click here to read Royal baby names: What’s likely for William and Kate’s 2nd child?

A Sample Chapter of Magna Carta and Its Gifts to Canada is Now Available Online

Magna Carta coverMy forthcoming book, Magna Carta and Its Gifts to Canada: Democracy, Law, and Human Rights will be published on May 2.

A sample chapter from the book is now available online. Click here to read Part 1: The History of Kings, Barons and the Commons.

In Canada, Magna Carta and Its Gifts to Canada: Democracy, Law, and Human Rights is available for pre-order from amazon.ca and Indigo. 

In the USA, Magna Carta and Its Gifts to Canada: Democracy, Law, and Human Rights is available for pre-order from amazon.com

In the UK, Magna Carta and Its Gifts to Canada: Democracy, Law, and Human Rights is available for pre-order from amazon.co.uk

New Canadian Encyclopedia Article: Fathers of Confederation: Jonathan McCully

Jonathan McCully

Jonathan McCully

My most recent article in the Canadian Encyclopedia discusses Jonathan McCully, one of the Fathers of Canadian Confederation from the Province of Nova Scotia.

Jonathan McCully was a strong advocate of Confederation in the Nova Scotia press from 1864 to 1867, writing pro-Confederation editorials for the Halifax Morning Chronicle and Unionist and Halifax Journal. He attended the Charlottetown Conference and the Québec Conferenceas part of the Liberal delegation from Nova Scotia. After Confederation, McCully became a senator and a judge of the Nova Scotia Supreme Court.

Click here to read my article on Jonathan McCully in the Canadian Encyclopedia

Friday Royal Read: Princes at War: The Bitter Battle Inside Britain’s Royal Family in the Darkest Days of WWII by Deborah Cadbury

The Abdication of King Edward VIII in 1936 and the wartime reign of his younger brother and successor, King George VI is well known. In contrast, their two youngest brothers, Henry, Duke of Gloucester and George, Duke of Kent are virtually unknown today.  Members of the public sometimes to struggle to recall how the Queen’s cousins, the current Dukes of Gloucester and Kent, are connected to the rest of the royal family. Edward VIII’s career after his abdication has also received less attention than the tumultuous events of 1936. In Princes at War: The Bitter Battle Inside Britain’s Royal Family in the Darkest Days of WWII, Deborah Cadbury, a BBC documentary producer and author of Chocolate Wars and The Lost King of France: How DNA Solved the Mystery of the Murdered Son of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, tells the story of all four royal brothers and the Second World War.

Cadbury’s history of the royal family at war reads like a novel, emphasizing the uncertainty of the early years of the hostilities when the outcome was unknown. While the British press reported the impending Blitz with defiant good humour including headlines like “French sign peace treaty. We’re in the finals!,” Buckingham Palace prepared for the worst. Barbed wire was laid in the gardens and Queen Elizabeth took shooting lessons. The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester and the Duke and Duchess of Kent assumed new leadership positions and traveled extensively, raising morale and welcoming commonwealth forces.

In contrast to the three dutiful younger brothers and their wives, the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, the former Edward VIII and Wallis Simpson, spent the early months of the war on a series of European holidays, surrounded by the intrigues of dubious financiers and Nazi informants. The Duke of Windsor was appointed Governor of the Bahamas – a position he accepted with great reluctance – to remove him from Europe for the duration of the war. Cadbury provides a page turning account of the Duke of Windsor’s last minute departure for the Bahamas as British agents persuaded him to leave while German agents implored him to remain on the continent. While George VI, his younger brothers, and their families observed wartime rationing in England, the Duchess of Windsor purchased one hundred dresses per year in the Bahamas.

Throughout the book, Cadbury places the House of Windsor in context, highlighting the harrowing experiences of Europe’s other ruling houses during the Second World War. Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands had to flee the Nazi invading force so quickly that she arrived in England in her nightdress covered by a raincoat. King Haakon VII of Norway refused to follow the example of his cousin, King Christian X of Denmark by capitulating to a Nazi occupation and declared “For my part I cannot accept the German demands. It would conflict with all that I have considered to be my duty as King of Norway since I came to this country nearly thirty-five years ago.” Haakon – King George VI’s “Uncle Charles”- spent his final wartime days in Norway in a log cabin near the Arctic Circle with only the local rifle association as a guard before going abroad to form a government in exile. Princess Mafalda of Italy died in a concentration camp. The rulers of the Balkan states found themselves squeezed between the Nazis and the Soviets on either side with devastating consequences.

Cadbury does not only look at the four royal brothers in the United Kingdom but writes about their travels around the Commonwealth including Canada. In his role as Air Commodore, the Duke of Kent toured Canada to inspect the Canadian war effort including the British Commonwealth Air Training Program. While the 1939 tour by George VI and Queen Elizabeth had been a traditional whistle-stop tour, the Duke of Kent crossed the country by air, in the manner of a modern royal visit. The Duke of Kent reported to George VI, “Canada has done a great work and they are 20% ahead of schedule.” The Second World War revitalized the relationship between the monarchy and the Commonwealth nations. Princes at War is a gripping account of a royal family at war and the lasting consequences of the conflict for the modern monarchy.

Next Week: John Guy, The Children of Henry VIII

New Canadian Encyclopedia Article: Fathers of Confederation: Thomas Heath Haviland

Thomas Heath Haviland

Thomas Heath Haviland

I have contributed an article to the Canadian Encyclopedia about Thomas Heath Haviland, one of the Fathers of Canadian Confederation from Prince Edward Island.

Thomas Heath Haviland was member of one of Prince Edward Island’s most prominent families under the “Family Compact” system that preceded responsible government. He favoured Confederation as a means to protect British North America against political and military encroachment from the United States. He attended the Québec Conference in 1864 and helped negotiate Prince Edward Island’s entry into Confederation in 1873.

Click here to read my article on Thomas Heath Haviland in the Canadian Encyclopedia

New Canadian Encyclopedia Article: Fathers of Confederation: Sir Samuel Leonard Tilley

Sir Samuel Leonard Tilley

Sir Samuel Leonard Tilley

I have revised and expanded the Canadian Encyclopedia article on Sir Samuel Leonard Tilley, the most influential of the Fathers of Confederation from New Brunswick.

Tilley was a strong supporter of both Confederation and the construction of the Intercolonial Railway. He is believed to have suggested the name “Dominion of Canada” for the new country. He was a member of Sir John A. Macdonald’s first government before he was appointed lieutenant-governor of New Brunswick. In contrast to a number of the other Fathers of Confederation, he favoured Prohibition.

Click here to read the article on Sir Samuel Leonard Tilley in the Canadian Encyclopedia

New Canadian Encyclopedia Article: Fathers of Confederation: John Hamilton Gray (New Brunswick)

John Hamilton Gray of New Brunswick

John Hamilton Gray of New Brunswick

I have revised and expanded the Canadian Encyclopedia article on John Hamilton Gray, one of the Fathers of Confederation from New Brunswick. (Not be confused with another Father of Confederation with the exact same name from Prince Edward Island).

John Hamilton Gray served in the New Brunswick Legislative Assembly, in the Canadian House of Commons and on the British Columbia Supreme Court. Remembered as a Father of Confederation, he was a very early proponent of British North American union and attended the Charlottetown and Québec Conferences. Gray was one of the few 19th-century public figures to oppose the discriminatory taxation and exclusion of Chinese immigration to Canada.

Click here to read the article on John Hamilton Gray in the Canadian Encyclopedia

 

New Canadian Encyclopedia Article: Fathers of Confederation: Peter Mitchell

Peter Mitchell

Peter Mitchell

I have revised and expanded the Canadian Encyclopedia article on Peter Mitchell, Premier of New Brunswick at the time of Canada’s Confederation in 1867. Mitchell was one of the most colourful characters in 19th century Canadian politics. He distributed rum to electors on the campaign trail, determined the route of the Intercolonial railway by “force of character” and caused an international incident as Prime Minister John A. Macdonald’s minister of Marine and Fisheries by apprehending American fishermen in Canadian waters.

Click here to read the article on Peter Mitchell in the Canadian Encyclopedia.

New Canadian Encyclopedia Article: Fathers of Confederation: Andrew Archibald Macdonald

Andrew Archibald Macdonald

Andrew Archibald Macdonald

My latest article in the Canadian Encyclopedia is about Andrew Archibald Macdonald, one of the Fathers of Canadian Confederation from Prince Edward Island. Macdonald was one of the Prince Edward Island delegates to the Charlottetown and Québec Conferences that preceded Confederation. Though initially opposed to a federal union, Macdonald changed his mind after the Island faced bankruptcy from its railway debt. He thereafter supported Prince Edward Island’s entry into Confederation, as Canada’s seventh province in 1873. Macdonald outlived all of the Fathers of Confederation except Sir Charles Tupper and wrote extensively about his experiences at the Confederation conferences in the last decade of his life.

Click here to read the article on Andrew Archibald Macdonald in the Canadian Encyclopedia