CBC News Interview: A ‘complicated transition’: How Kate is stepping up her public role for the royals

I discussed the role of the Duchess of Cambridge with Janet Davison at CBC News. Here’s an excerpt from the interview:

“For Kate, it’s been a “complicated transition,” said Carolyn Harris, a Toronto-based royal author and historian.

Kate came to public prominence once it was known she was dating William. She took part in a television interview at the time of their engagement, but didn’t make a public speech until 2012. In many ways, it seemed she was being eased into royal duties more slowly than previous generations.

For William’s mother, Diana, three decades earlier, “it was a very fast transition into royal life,” said Harris.”

Click here to read A ‘complicated transition’: How Kate is stepping up her public role for the royals at CBC News

New York Magazine Interview: Inside the Royal Gossip Machine

Diana, Princess of Wales at the Cannes Film Festival in 1987

My recent interview with Lisa Ryan for The Cut, New York Magazine, examines the history of royal reporting including how the royal family has shaped its own image over the centuries from the reign of King George III to the present day.

Here an excerpt from the interview:

“This isn’t a new game; reporting on royal gossip has been happening for a while, though it’s certainly evolved under different monarchs’ reigns. “It’s varied over time, as there’s a balance between maintaining the mystique of the monarchy and ensuring members of the royal family have a private life to some degree, but also responding to a very strong public interest in royalty and life behind palace doors that has existed for centuries,” royal historian Carolyn Harris, the author of Raising Royalty: 1,000 Years of Royal Parenting, told the Cut.”

Click here to read “Inside the Royal Gossip Machine” in New York Magazine

 

CBC News Interview: Why the royal Christmas is under more scrutiny this year

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, The Duke and Duchess of Sussex and Lady Louise on Christmas Day 2017

I discussed the rumours of conflict between Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex with Janet Davison at CBC News.

Here is an excerpt from the interview:

“In the 19th century, when foreign royalty was marrying into the Royal Family, sometimes political differences complicated personal relationships,” said Harris. Queen Victoria found herself banning dinner conversation about a conflict between Denmark and Germany because of personal tensions amid family members.

And then there’s the conflict that erupted with the arrival of Wallis Simpson, the twice-divorced American who was at the root of Edward VIII’s abdication from the throne in 1936.”

Click here to read ‘Duelling duchesses’ and a Game of Thrones script: Why the royal Christmas is under more scrutiny this year at CBC News

Huffington Post Interview: How Meghan Markle And Prince Harry’s Wedding Differed From The Last Royal Nuptials

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after their wedding on April 29, 2011.

I compared the weddings of Prince William and Catherine Middleton (now the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge) and Prince Harry and Meghan Markle (now the Duke and Duchess of Sussex) in an interview with the Huffington Post, along with Marlene Koenig at Royal Musings Here is an excerpt from the interview:

“At the last royal wedding, things went a little more by the book, with Michael Francis Middleton walking his daughter, the soon-to-be Duchess of Cambridge, down the aisle to meet Prince William.

There is royal precedent for close relatives stepping in to handle escort duty. Queen Victoria, whose father died when she was an infant, was walked down the aisle by one of her uncles when she married Prince Albert, said Carolyn Harris, the author of Queenship and Revolution in Early Modern Europe: Henrietta Maria and Marie Antoinette.”

Click here to read “How Meghan Markle And Prince Harry’s Wedding Differed From The Last Royal Nuptials” in the Huffington Post

My BBC History Magazine article: The 8 most famous royal weddings in British history

Charles and Diana, Prince and Princess of Wales on their wedding day in 1981

In honour of the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle this weekend, my feature article in the BBC History Magazine is about the 8 most famous royal weddings in British history. I discuss what each bride wore on her wedding day, guest list complications, wedding cakes and the variety of popular responses to royal weddings over the centuries from Tudor times to today.

Click here to read The 8 Most Famous Royal Weddings in British History

 

CBC News Channel Interview: Prince William Will Be Prince Harry’s Best Man

Prince William, The Duke of Cambridge

The planning for the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle on May 19 continues with the announcement that Prince William will be his brother’s best man. Prince Harry was the best man at the wedding of Prince William to Catherine Middleton in 2011. I discussed royal wedding planning with the CBC News Network earlier this week.

Click here to watch “CBC News Network speaks with Royal Historian Carolyn Harris following the announcement that Prince William will be Prince Harry’s Best Man.”

 

CBC News Network Interview: Third Royal Baby Is A Boy

I discussed the new royal baby with the CBC News Network on Monday April 23. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are now the parents of three children, Prince George, Princess Charlotte and the newborn prince. In the interview, I discuss the celebrations surrounding the birth, the impact on the royal succession and trends in royal baby name choices. Click here to watch the interview.

My January-February 2018 course at University of Toronto School of Continuing Studies: Family Life from Medieval to Modern Times

On Wednesday afternoons in January and February 2018, I will be teaching an eight week history course about Family Life from Medieval to Modern Times.

Click here for more information and to register.

Course Description:

Our views on marriage and childrearing would seem very strange to families of past centuries. We’ll see the influence of romanticism on the current understanding of family life, the changing role of grandparents in relation to family traditions, and the emergence of a distinct children’s culture including the birth of children’s literature, due in part to the expansion of formal education. Join us for a look at marriage and parenting customs and advice through the centuries, and the surprising influence of history on family life today.
Learning Outcomes:

National Post review of Raising Royalty: “Murder your children’s rivals, and other parenting tips from royals”

19th century portrait of Peter the Great interrogating his son, Alexei

My new book, Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting, is featured in the weekend National Post including quotes from the chapters about Peter the Great, Queen Victoria and Henry VIII.

“[The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge] want Princess Charlotte and Prince George to go to the local school. They want to be hands-on parents. On the day George left the hospital, William wrestled with the lad’s car seat, a performance reenacted daily by new dads the world over. The message they hoped you’d glean from it? Will and Kate are just like you and me.

In her new book, Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting, Canadian historian Carolyn Harris reveals there may be other parenting tips to be gleaned from royal watching. With Harris as inspiration, we offer six tips from moms and dads who also happened to be monarchs.”

Click here to read “Murder your children’s rivals, and other parenting tips from royals” in the National Post

New Quartz Article: The history of British royalty proves raising a kid is always a group effort

Princess Charlotte, the Duchess of Cambridge, Prince George and the Duke of Cambridge in Victoria, British Columbia (Photo Credit: The Canadian Press)

My latest article in Quartz Magazine discussed the role of the extended family in royal parenting over the centuries.

“As I discuss in my new book, Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting, the upbringing of a royal child has always included a wide circle of people including grandparents, aunts, uncles, friends, tutors, nannies and governesses. In fact, royal parenting has acquired a negative reputation over the centuries because of how often kings and queens delegated the daily routine of childrearing to their extended family and household. But there’s another way of looking at this tradition: Royal children have had a large support system during both good times and difficult times.”

Click here to read “The history of British royalty proves raising a kid is always a group effort” in Quartz Magazine

Click here to purchase my book, Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting