CBC News Interview: Harry and Meghan’s wedding will break new ground, but tradition won’t ‘go out the window’

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle

I discussed Prince Harry, Meghan Markle and Windsor Castle as a location for royal wedding celebrations with Janet Davison at the CBC and I am quoted in the first edition of the new CBC News royal wedding newsletter, the Royal Fascinator.

Click here to read THE ROYAL FASCINATOR: Harry and Meghan’s wedding will break new ground, but tradition won’t ‘go out the window’ and to subscribe to the newsletter!

 

National Post Interview: Light everything on fire: What would have happened had the Nazis invaded Britain

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth in British Columbia in 1939

I discussed the royal family during the Second World War with Tristin Hopper at the National Post. King George VI, Queen Elizabeth and their children, the future Queen Elizabeth II and Princess Margaret were determined to remain together in Britain but there were contingency plans in the event of a German invasion, including the purchase of Hatley Castle in British Columbia by Canadian Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King as a possible wartime residence for the royal family.

Click here to read “Light everything on fire: What would have happened had the Nazis invaded Britain” in the National Post

CBC News Network Interview: The Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall Visit Prince Edward County

Prince Charles tours the Wellington Farmer’s Market in Ontario, Friday June 30, 2017.
[Photo credit: Peter J. Thompson]

I discussed the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall’s visit to Prince Edward County on the CBC News Network this afternoon including Prince Charles’s interest in organic farming, the first royal walkabout in Canada in 1939 and the history of Queen Elizabeth II’s Canadian tours

Click here to watch: “Carolyn Harris interview – Live coverage of royal tour on CBC News Network”

I am also quoted in the CBC article “Retired soldier takes to life on the farm, with help from Prince Charles”

University of Toronto News Interview: Prince Philip rumours go viral

Prince Philip in 2008.

Before the announcement that Prince Philip would be retiring from public life at the end of the summer, there was widespread speculation on social media that Buckingham Palace would be announcing his death on the morning of May 4 as members of the royal household gathered for an “eleventh hour” meeting.

There were also more optimistic theories including the idea that forthcoming renovations to Buckingham Palace would prompt an announcement that the Queen and Prince Philip were moving to Windsor Castle or Balmoral for an extended period of time. In an interview with University of Toronto news, I discuss the timeless fascination with events behind palace doors and how the internet has accelerated the spread of royal rumors.

Buckingham Palace, London

Click here to read “Prince Philip rumours go viral: U of T expert talks about centuries of royal gossip” at UofT news

Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting now available for purchase

My 3rd book, Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting, has been published by Dundurn Press in Canada. (The USA and UK release date is May 2).

Click here to purchase your copy of Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting

How royal parents dealt with raising their children over the past thousand years, from keeping Vikings at bay to fending off paparazzi.

William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, are setting trends for millions of parents around the world. The upbringing of their children, Prince George and Princess Charlotte, is the focus of intense popular scrutiny. Royalty have always raised their children in the public eye and attracted praise or criticism according to parenting standards of their day.

Royal parents have faced unique challenges and held unique privileges. In medieval times, raising an heir often meant raising a rival, and monarchs sometimes faced their grown children on the battlefield. Conversely, kings and queens who lost their thrones in wars or popular revolutions often found solace in time spent with their children. In modern times, royal duties and overseas tours have often separated young princes and princesses from their parents, a circumstance that is slowly changing with the current generation of royalty.

Click here to purchase your copy of Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting

CTV News Channel Interview: Prince George and Princess Charlotte in Canada

Princess Charlotte, the Duchess of Cambridge, Prince George and the Duke of Cambridge in Victoria, British Columbia (Photo Credit: The Canadian Press)

Princess Charlotte, the Duchess of Cambridge, Prince George and the Duke of Cambridge in Victoria, British Columbia (Photo Credit: The Canadian Press)

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and their children attended a garden party for military families at Government House in Victoria, British Columbia this afternoon. I discussed the event and royal parenting with the CTV News Channel this evening.

Click here to watch my interview with the CTV news channel.

My next interview with the CTV News Channel about the Royal Visit to Canada will be on Saturday, October 1 at 8:10am ET.

My January-February 2016 course: Artists and Their Royal Patrons

800px-Henrietta_Maria_and_Charles_I In January and February 2016, I will be teaching an eight week course on Wednesday afternoons about Artists and Their Royal Patrons at the University of Toronto School of Continuing Studies. Click here to register

For centuries, artists sought out royal patrons to advance their careers. European monarchs were eager to fill their courts with artists to demonstrate their own acumen and prestige. Through lectures, images and discussions, Carolyn Harris will lead you through a lively exploration of the relations between great artists and their royal patrons. These include Hans Holbein and Henry VIII, Leonardo da Vinci and François I, Anthony van Dyck and Charles I, Peter Paul Rubens and Marie de Medici, and Élisabeth Vigée-LeBrun and Marie Antoinette. We will look at Catherine the Great, who helped found the Hermitage Museum, and Queen Elizabeth II, who is appreciated as a “curator monarch” for her part in opening the British Royal Collection to the public. You’ll learn more about the collaboration and tension between royalty and artists that produced some of Europe’s most famous works of art and established collections now featured in great museums around the world.

Click here for more information and to register

 

My book “Queenship and Revolution in Early Modern Europe: Henrietta Maria and Marie Antoinette” is now available for purchase

My book, Queenship and Revolution in Early Modern Europe: Henrietta Maria and Marie Antoinette, has been published by Palgrave MacMillan as part of the Queenship and Power series.

Review: “Harris’ richly detailed comparative study of Henrietta Maria and Marie Antoinette offers fresh perspective on how both queens understood their roles as heads of households, wives, and mothers and how, in turn, those roles were interpreted by their husbands’ subjects. Combining a rigorous review of the literature with new research and original analytical insights, Harris has crafted an eminently readable and engaging work that effectively illuminates the complex nature of early modern queenship and revolution.” –Michelle White, UC Foundation Professor of History, University of Tennessee – Chattanooga, USA

About the book: Queen Marie Antoinette, wife of King Louis XVI of France and Queen Henrietta Maria, wife of King Charles I of England were two of the most notorious queens in European history. They both faced accusations that they had transgressed social, gender and regional norms, and attempted to defend themselves against negative reactions to their behavior. Each queen engaged with the debates of her time concerning the place of women within their families, religion, politics, the public sphere and court culture and attempted to counter criticism of her foreign origins and political influence. The impeachment of Henrietta Maria in 1643 and trial and execution of Marie Antoinette in 1793 were also trials of monarchical government that shaped the English Civil Wars and French Revolution.

In Canada, Queenship and Revolution in Early Modern Europe: Henrietta Maria and Marie Antoinette is available from Amazon.ca and variety of other booksellers.

In the USA,Queenship and Revolution in Early Modern Europe: Henrietta Maria and Marie Antoinette (Queenship and Power) is available from Amazon.com and directly from Palgrave Macmillan

In the UK, Queenship and Revolution in Early Modern Europe: Henrietta Maria and Marie Antoinette (Queenship and Power) is available from Amazon.co.uk and directly from Palgrave Macmillan

In the USA and UK, order directly from Palgrave Macmillan by December 31 with the discount code PM15THIRTY to receive 30% off. View the Queenship and Revolution in Early Modern Europe flyer here for more information.

Toronto Public Library Talk on September 24: Peter the Great and the Building of St. Petersburg

Peter the Great in 1698

Peter the Great in 1698

I will be giving a lecture at Deer Park Library in Toronto (40 St. Clair Avenue East) about Peter the Great of Russia and the Building of St Petersburg on September 24 at 2pm. 

Czar Peter the Great (r. 1682-1725) wanted to open up Russia to the rest of Europe. In 1703, he ordered the building of a new capital on the Baltic Sea that was unlike any other Russian city. St. Petersburg would be Peter the Great’s window to the west and the setting for some of the most dramatic moments in Russian history. The lecture will include images of Imperial Russian art and architecture as well as photographs from my 2013 visit to St. Petersburg.

Tickets may be reserved by phone or in person on Sept 23. Click here for more information.

 

Today.com Interview: Could she be queen? See where the new royal baby fits in line to the throne

The Duchess of Cambridge with the newborn Prince George of Cambridge in July, 2013

The Duchess of Cambridge with the newborn Prince George of Cambridge in July, 2013

The Duchess of Cambridge gave birth to a baby girl at 8:34am (BT) on May 2. The baby weighs 8lbs 6oz and the Duke of Cambridge was present for the birth in the Lindo Wing of St. Mary’s Hospital. My interview with Today.com discusses the experiences of past royal second children. In the past century,  the press has often portrayed ‘the spare’ as the more spontaneous royal sibling, enjoying wealth and privilege without the responsibilities of kingship. Over the long course of royal history, however, there has always been the distinct possibility that a second royal child might succeed to the throne. The most recent “spare” to become the reigning monarch was Queen Elizabeth II’s father, King George VI.

Click here to read “Could she be queen? See where the new royal baby fits in line to the throne”

The interview also mentions my first book, Magna Carta and Its Gifts to Canada: Democracy, Law, and Human Rights, which was published today!