CBC News Interview: Royal pregnancy and privacy: How Harry and Meghan and other royals are setting their own terms for parenthood

I discussed royal parenting and pregnancy announcements with Janet Davison at CBC News for this week’s The Royal Fascinator newsletter. In the youngest generation of the royal family, only the children of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are expected to undertake full time royal duties when they grow up. The arrival or forthcoming arrival of the Queen’s other great-grandchildren such as Princess Eugenie’s son August Philip Hawke Brooksbank and the expected second child of Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex has been announced in a variety of different ways on social media rather than official announcements from Buckingham Palace alone.

Click here to read “Royal pregnancy and privacy: How Harry and Meghan and other royals are setting their own terms for parenthood” at CBC News

For more about the history of royal parenting, see my book, Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royalty

New BBC History Magazine Article: From balls to Bridgerton: a brief history of debutantes and the social season

My new feature article in History Extra, the online BBC History Magazine is about the history of debutantes and social season from the first Queen Charlotte’s Ball in 1780 to the last presentation of debutantes to the royal family in 1958. In addition to the fashions, parties and traditions of the social season in the United Kingdom, I also discuss debutante traditions in Canada, the United States and Australia.

Click here to read “From balls to Bridgerton: a brief history of debutantes and the social season” at History Extra

Huffington Post Interview: Why Queen Elizabeth Probably Wants To Keep The ‘Royal Family’ Film Hidden Away

In a second article in the Huffington Post, I discussed the controversies surrounding the 1969 Royal Family documentary with Carly Ledbetter. The interview includes reasons why the Royal Family has kept the documentary out of the public eye in recent decades and how the program might be different if it was filmed today.

Click here to read “Why Queen Elizabeth Probably Wants To Keep The ‘Royal Family’ Film Hidden Away” in the Huffington Post

Huffington Post Interview: Standout Moments From The Banned Royal Family Film, According To Royal Experts

I discussed the controversial 1969 Royal Family documentary with Carly Ledbetter from Huffington Post, an early example of the royal family interacting with one another behind palace doors on camera for a public audience. The program has not been officially available to the public in its entirety since the 1970s but appeared online for a brief period in the past few weeks. The interview includes discussion about royal public engagements, portrayals of the royal children on film and the 1968 royal tour of South America.

Click here to read “Standout Moments From The Banned Royal Family Film, According To Royal Experts” in the Huffington Post

March-April 2021 Online Course: Marie Antoinette and the French Revolution

My March-April 2021 online course on Marie Antoinette and the French Revolution begins at the University of Toronto School of Continuing Studies on March 9, 2021. Click here for more information and to register.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

More than 200 years after her execution, Queen Marie Antoinette is still one of the most famous and controversial figures in European history. In late 18th-century France, her reputation influenced debates about the role of women in politics, their families and the arts. Austrian-born, her position at the top of French society fueled criticism of the monarchy and contributed to the outbreak of the French Revolution in 1789. Her influence on popular culture continues today.

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN

  • Discover the real Queen Marie Antoinette behind centuries of myths in popular culture.
  • Trace the reasons for her controversial reputation.
  • Explore the clashes in the politics, culture and society of royal and revolutionary France.
  • Look behind the legend and examine the controversial queen’s impact on politics, culture and society.

Click here for more information and to register.

CBC News Interview: Why the Queen let it be known she’s had the COVID-19 vaccine

In this week’s CBC News Royal Fascinator newsletter, I discussed royal vaccinations and the public profile of Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall during the pandemic with Janet Davison. I compared Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip’s decision to have their vaccinations announced to the wider public in 2021 with 18th century monarchs who publicized their smallpox inoculations in their own time.

Click here to read “Why the Queen let it be known she’s had the COVID-19 vaccine” in The Royal Fascinator at CBC News

North Americana Podcast Interview: The 1939 Royal Tour of Canada and the USA

I discussed King George VI’s and Queen Elizabeth’s 1939 tour of Canada and the United States with Liz Beatty for latest episode of the North Americana podcast: “How a King, a President, a Railway Empire and a Hotdog Helped Save the Free World.”

Click here to listen to “How a King, a President, a Railway Empire and a Hotdog Helped Save the Free World” on the North Americana website. (My quotes are in the last third of the program).

New BBC History Magazine Article: Princess Feodora: the little-known sister of Queen Victoria

My new article in the BBC History Magazine (History Extra) is about Princess Feodora, the little known half sister of Queen Victoria. The two sisters had a warm relationship and corresponded with one another for decades. Princess Feodora was a valuable source of advice and support for Queen Victoria and they discussed a wide variety of topics in their letters including European politics, their favourite books, marriage and motherhood.

Click here to read Princess Feodora: the little-known sister of Queen Victoria in the BBC History Magazine

Toronto Star Interview: When it comes to the British royal family, Canadians prefer the Netflix version

I discussed The Crown series on Netflix with Susan Delacourt at the Toronto Star, focusing on the uneven coverage of Commonwealth history and the complete absence of Canadian royal tours from the series.

Click here to read “When it comes to the British royal family, Canadians prefer the Netflix version” in The Toronto Star

The interview also appears in the St. Catharines Standard