HELLO! Canada Magazine review of Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting

My new book, Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting has received a great review in HELLO! Canada Magazine from Editor-in-Chief Alison Eastwood:

“When we saw Prince William gamely attempt to buckle baby Prince George into his car seat outside St. Mary’s hospital, public fascination with royal parenting peaked and, thanks to the arrival of George’s sister Charlotte, shows no sign of diminishing. Raising Royalty is well placed to satiate this interest. Using today’s royals as a jumping off point, Canadian historian Carolyn turns back the clock and deftly guides us through 10 centuries of royal child-rearing (a highlight is Queen Victoria and her “deeply ambivalent” approach toward her nine children). Informative, amusing and royally riveting.”

Click here to see the review in HELLO! Canada Magazine

Click here to purchase Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting from Amazon.

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49th Shelf Article: Raising Royalty: The Canadian History

My latest article in The 49th Shelf discusses the history of royal parenting in Canada. My new book, Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting, examines how twenty sets of royal parents raised their children over the course of the past thousand years. Key moments in this history of royal parenting took place in Canada including the 2016 royal tour by William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and their children, Prince George and Princess Charlotte, Princess Diana’s warm embrace of her two sons, Prince William and Prince Harry on the Royal Yacht Britannia in Toronto Harbour, and the birth of Princess Margriet of the Netherlands in Ottawa during the Second World War.

Click here to read Raising Royalty: The Canadian History at the 49th Shelf

Click here to purchase Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting

 

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Smithsonian Russian Revolution Series: April 1917: The Provisional Government

Prince Georgy Lvov, 1st Prime Minister of the Russian Provisional Government in 1917

The April 1917 article in my monthly Smithsonian Russian Revolution series examines the struggles faced by the new Provisional Government after Czar Nicholas II abdicated. The new Prime Minister, Prince Georgy Lvov, a Russian nobleman, found himself politically isolated and unable to reconcile the competing demands of conservative and socialist political factions.

The rising star in Lvov’s government was Alexander Kerensky, Minister of Justice, whose first order of business was investigating former Czar Nicholas II. When Lvov’s government faced protests because of its determination to fulfill Czarist diplomatic and military obligations including Russia’s participation in the First World War, Kerensky orchestrated a coalition government with socialist parties and became Minister of War, events that became known as the April Crisis. Vladimir Lenin’s Bolshevik party, however, remained in opposition to this government, demanding an immediate end to hostilities on the eastern front.

Click here to read “In a Czar-less Russia, Winning was Easy. Governing was Harder” in Smithsonian Magazine

Click here to read my entire Russian Revolution series (so far) in Smithsonian Magazine

Sources and Further Reading:

The quote at the beginning of the article is from Leo Tolstoy’s celebrated novel, Anna Karenina. Tolstoy and Lvov had been neighbours and shared a common disdain for the ostentatious lifestyle expected of members of the Czarist nobility before the Russian Revolution.

Lvov’s early life and career are discussed in detail in Orlando Figes’ history of the Russian Revolution, A People’s Tragedy. The book also discusses the difficult position faced by the Provisional Government in the Spring of 1917.

Accounts of celebrations of the establishment of the Provisional Government across Russia are included in War and Revolution in Russia 1914-1922 by Christopher Read.

Documents related to the Provisional Government’s arrest and investigation of the former Imperial family are translated and reprinted in The Fall of the Romanovs, a collection of primary sources about the Romanovs during and after the Russian Revolutions of 1917.

The memoirs of Alexander Kerensky have recently been reprinted in e-book form as The Catastrophe: Kerensky’s Own Story of the Russian Revolution

Lenin’s return to Russia is the subject of a recent book, Lenin on the Train by Catherine Merridale, author of Red Fortress, a history of Moscow’s Kremlin. Lenin’s writings and speeches are also available online.

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CBC Books Interview: 6 Must Reads for the Royal Obsessed

I discussed my new book Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting and some of my favorite royal books – fiction and non-fiction – with CBC books. The books I recommend include Our Queen by Robert Hardman, Monarchy and the End of Empire: The House of Windsor, the British Government, and the Postwar Commonwealth by Philip Murphy, Mrs Queen Takes the Train by William Kuhn, Abundance: A Novel of Marie Antoinette by Sena Jeter Naslund and The Winter Palace by Eva Stachniak.

Click here to read “6 must-reads for the royal obsessed from expert and author Carolyn Harris” at CBC Books

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Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting now available for purchase

My 3rd book, Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting, has been published by Dundurn Press in Canada. (The USA and UK release date is May 2).

Click here to purchase your copy of Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting

How royal parents dealt with raising their children over the past thousand years, from keeping Vikings at bay to fending off paparazzi.

William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, are setting trends for millions of parents around the world. The upbringing of their children, Prince George and Princess Charlotte, is the focus of intense popular scrutiny. Royalty have always raised their children in the public eye and attracted praise or criticism according to parenting standards of their day.

Royal parents have faced unique challenges and held unique privileges. In medieval times, raising an heir often meant raising a rival, and monarchs sometimes faced their grown children on the battlefield. Conversely, kings and queens who lost their thrones in wars or popular revolutions often found solace in time spent with their children. In modern times, royal duties and overseas tours have often separated young princes and princesses from their parents, a circumstance that is slowly changing with the current generation of royalty.

Click here to purchase your copy of Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting

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Review of Queenship and Revolution in Early Modern Europe in the Canadian Journal of History

My 2nd book Queenship and Revolution in Early Modern Europe: Henrietta Maria and Marie Antoinette has been reviewed by historian Sharon Jansen in the Spring/Summer 2017 issue of the Canadian Journal of History. Jansen describes the book as “An excellent example of careful archival scholarship and thoughtful gender analysis.”

Click here to read the review in the Canadian Journal of History

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Open History Interview: Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting

I discussed the research and writing of my latest book, Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting, with Open History. The interview includes how the book came together, why I decided to write about the history of royal parenting and the impact of the history of royal parenting on modern Canadian culture.

Click here to read “Open History – Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting”

Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting is currently for sale in Chapters/Indigo bookstores and will be available across Canada on April 8. The USA/UK publication date is May 2.

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Ben McNally Books/Globe & Mail Books and Brunch on April 9

I will be speaking about my latest book Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting at the Ben McNally Books/Globe & Mail Books and Brunch on April 9 at the King Edward hotel in Toronto. Tickets are $55 and must be purchased in advance. Book sale and signing to follow.  Click here for more information

Click here to pre-order my book, Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting 

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