Hello! Canada Interview: The Life of a Princess

The newborn Princess Charlotte of Cambridge (photo credit: Samir Hussein/WireImage)

The newborn Princess Charlotte of Cambridge (photo credit: Samir Hussein/WireImage)

I talked to Hello! Canada about the lives of Princesses past and present for the magazine’s special edition on the birth of Princess Charlotte.

Click here to read  The Life of a Princess in Hello! Canada

Upcoming Radio Interview on the Monarchy: CBC World at Six on May 18, 2015

In honour of Victoria Day, CBC World at Six will be presenting a special about what the monarchy means to Canadians today. I will be discussing how royal tours and events have been brought to the attention of a new generation through social media as well as the delicate balance between maintaining the “royal mystique” and responding to the public’s interest in life behind palace doors. I will also talk about how William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are transforming the way the royal family is perceived by the public.

Following broadcast at 6pm on May 18, the monarchy episode of CBC World at 6 will be available for download as a podcast from CBC radio.

Canada’s History Magazine Interview: The Great Charter


I was interviewed by Christopher Moore at Canada’s History Magazine about King John,  Magna Carta and my new book Magna Carta and Its Gifts to Canada: Democracy, Law, and Human Rights. I explained how King John’s failings as a monarch from his military defeats to his arbitrary rule brought together a broad coalition of rebel barons, clergymen and the rulers of Wales and Scotland in support of a Charter that placed limits on the monarch’s power. The interview is part of a longer article about the forthcoming Magna Carta Canada 2015 touring exhibition, which will bring Magna Carta and its Companion document, the Charter of the Forest to Canada for the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta.  I also contributed the “Magna Carta by the Numbers” section of this article.

Click here to read: “The Great Charter: Why a thirteenth-century piece of parchment endorsed by an English king who was under threat of death has meaning for Canadians today.” in Canada’s History Magazine

My article “Magna Carta: From Medieval England to Canada Today” at 49th Shelf

My new book Magna Carta and Its Gifts to Canada: Democracy, Law, and Human Rights is featured on the 49th shelf, a website devoted to Canadian books and authors. In my article at 49th Shelf, I discuss the Magna Carta of 1215, which was the first example of a King of England accepting limits on his powers imposed by his subjects. I also explain how the significance of this document has evolved over the past eight hundred years. Magna Carta has had a profound impact on Canadian history, politics and law. For the Fathers of Confederation, the constitutional and legal traditions informed by Magna Carta were essential to the creation of the new Dominion of Canada. The limits imposed on King John’s rule were essential to the development of parliament in the mid-thirteenth century and then the constitutional monarchy enshrined by the English Bill of Rights in 1689, which became Canada’s system of government.

Click here to read Magna Carta: From Medieval England to Canada Today at 49th Shelf

 

Interview: What does ‘Occupation: Princess’ mean? Here’s what the royals actually do

The Duchess of Cambridge celebrates Canada Day in Ottawa, July 1, 2011

The Duchess of Cambridge celebrates Canada Day in Ottawa, July 1, 2011

My latest interview for Yahoo Shine Canada discusses the wide range of official duties performed by royalty today. Since the reign of King George III, philanthropy has been a key role for royalty, especially princesses. Queen Victoria’s five daughters all assumed charitable patronages, many of which were devoted to the health and education of women and girls. Today, representing Queen Elizabeth II at official engagements is also an important role for members of the royal family. The Queen and Prince Philip have reduced their overseas travel in recent years and their children and grandchildren often represent them outside the United Kingdom.

Click here to read “What does ‘Occupation: Princess’ mean? Here’s what the royals actually do” at Yahoo Shine Canada

Toronto Star Interview: Duke and Duchess of Cambridge introduce new princess to the world

The Duchess of York, Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie at the premiere of The Young Victoria in 2009. Photo by Brent Perniac/AdMedia/KEYSTONE Press

The Duchess of York, Princess Beatrice (right) and Princess Eugenie at the premiere of The Young Victoria in 2009. Photo by Brent Perniac/AdMedia/KEYSTONE Press

My latest interview with the Toronto Star discusses recent royal princesses. The last princess to be born in the United Kingdom was Princess Eugenie, the younger of the two daughters of the Duke and Duchess of York. Eugenie was born in 1990. In 2003, the Countess of Wessex gave birth to a baby girl but she was styled Lady Louise rather than Princess Louise as the Earl and Countess of Wessex wished for their children to be styled as children of an earl. The newborn Princess of Cambridge is therefore the first princess to be born in the United Kingdom in 25 years.

Click here to read “Duke and Duchess of Cambridge introduce new princess to the world” in the Toronto Star

Toronto Star Interview: Prince William tells crowd family is ‘very happy’

Prince William, The Duke of Cambridge

Prince William, The Duke of Cambridge

I am quoted in this Toronto Star article “Prince William tells crowd family is ‘very happy’” about the arrival of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s second child. Prince William left the hospital a few hours after the birth to collect his son Prince George and bring him to St. Mary’s hospital. As I discuss in the article, there is immense public interest in Prince George’s appearances because there are so few of them. Prince George was seen leaving the hospital the day after his birth in 2013, at his christening that same year and on the 2014 Australia and New Zealand tour but this is his first official public appearance as a toddler.

Click here to read Prince William tells crowd family is ‘very happy’ in the Toronto Star

Magna Carta and Its Gifts to Canada is now available in Canada!

My 1st book, Magna Carta and Its Gifts to Canada: Democracy, Law, and Human Rights is now available in bookstores across Canada just six weeks before the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta and the start of the Magna Carta Canada 2015 touring exhibition.

Click here for more about the book and to order directly from Dundurn Press.

Click here to order Magna Carta and Its Gifts to Canada from Amazon.ca

Click here to order Magna Carta and Its Gifts to Canada from Indigo

 

CBC Interview: Royal Baby 2: The risks and rewards of being ‘the spare’ to the throne

Queen Mary with her granddaughters Princess Elizabeth, the future Elizabeth II and Princess Margaret. George V's consort believed that younger royals should be prepared for their future life of public service.

Queen Mary with her granddaughters Princess Elizabeth, the future Elizabeth II and Princess Margaret.

My latest interview for CBC.ca discusses “The risks and rewards of being ‘the spare’ to the throne.” For recent “spares” such as Princess Margaret, Prince Andrew and Prince Harry, there has been the challenge of carving out a meaningful role in public life. Both Andrew and Harry experienced success in their military careers but Andrew has faced criticism since leaving the military and there is speculation that Harry may face challenges finding a new role once he finishes his secondment with the Australian forces.

For the Queen’s younger sister, Princess Margaret, life as “the spare” initially seemed glamorous but she was discouraged from marrying the man she loved and, like Prince Andrew, was criticized for her travel and spending. Before the current reign, however, “the spare” had a good chance of succeeding to the throne. George VI, George V, Charles I and Henry VIII were all second sons while Elizabeth I and Queen Anne were second daughters. There have been other monarchs were born even further down the line of succession. Henry I, King John and Richard III were all fourth surviving sons and Queen Victoria was the daughter of King George III’s fourth son.

Click here to read “Royal Baby 2: The risks and rewards of being ‘the spare’ to the throne”

National Post Interview: ‘Alice’ and ‘Arthur’ lead the pack as Royal baby name game heats up at U.K. bookmakers

Princess Alice of Bettenberg (1885-1969), mother of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh

Princess Alice of Battenberg (1885-1969), mother of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh

My latest interview on the history of royal baby names, “Alice’ and ‘Arthur’ lead the pack as Royal baby name game heats up at U.K. bookmakers” is in the National Post. There is widespread speculation that the royal baby will be a girl. Both of the names favoured by the British bookmakers, Alice and Charlotte have royal antecedents. Queen Victoria’s second daughter was Princess Alice of Hesse-Darmstadt and her great-granddaughter was Princess Alice of Battenberg, the mother of Prince Philip. One of Queen Victoria’s granddaughters, Princess Alice, Countess of Athlone was the consort of the Governor General of Canada during the Second World War.

Charlotte was a popular royal name in Georgian England as it was the name of George III’s queen, Charlotte of Mecklenberg, her daughter, Princess Charlotte of Württemberg and her ill fated granddaughter, Princess Charlotte of Wales, who died in childbirth in 1817, giving birth to a stillborn son. Princess Charlotte of Wales was second-in-line to the throne at the time of her death and her pregnancy was the first instance of bookmakers taking bets on whether a royal baby would be a boy or a girl.

Click here to read Alice’ and ‘Arthur’ lead the pack as Royal baby name game heats up at U.K. bookmakers