TIME Interview: How a Royal Baby Is Born, From Tudor Times to Meghan Markle’s Modernity

I discussed the history of royal births with Olivia B. Waxman at TIME. The circumstances surrounding the arrival of royal children have changed over successive centuries from the secluded atmosphere of a Tudor confinement to the summoning of a French midwife by Charles I’s queen, Henrietta Maria to the presence of the Home Secretary at royal births until the arrival of Prince Charles in 1948. The birth of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s child will be part of this long history of tradition and innovation in the royal birth chamber.

Click here to read “How a Royal Baby Is Born, From Tudor Times to Meghan Markle’s Modernity” in TIME Magazine

Today Interview: If Meghan Markle gives birth at home, she’ll be following a royal tradition

I discussed the history of royal births with Eun Kim at Today.com. Prince Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex have decided to keep plans to for the arrival of their baby private, which has prompted speculation concerning whether they will choose a hospital or a private residence for the birth.

Here is an excerpt from the interview:

“A home birth would be a return to earlier royal traditions,” said historian Carolyn Harris, author of Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting.

Home births were actually common for women of all social backgrounds in the United Kingdom until the creation of the National Health Service in 1948, the turning point for hospital births.

But there was another reason for members of the royal family to continue delivering their children behind palace walls.

“For royalty, home births had the advantage of privacy and all the space to accommodate large numbers of official and personal visitors without inconveniencing other families in a hospital,” Harris said.

Click here to read the full article: “If Meghan Markle gives birth at home, she’ll be following a royal tradition”

Associated Press Interview: Diana? Alice? Elizabeth? Britons bet on new royal baby name

I discussed potential names for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s baby with Sylvia Hui at the Associated Press. For a baby girl, possibilities include Diana, the name of Prince Harry’s late mother, Elizabeth, the name of Harry’s grandmother the Queen, and Alice, which was the name of Harry’s great-grandmother, Prince Philip’s mother Princess Alice of Battenberg.

Other possible names include Ruth, a name of great-grandmothers of both Harry and Meghan, and Eleanor, the name of a series of 12th and 13th century English queens including the famous Eleanor of Aquitaine as well as American First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt.

Click here to read “Diana? Alice? Elizabeth? Britons bet on new royal baby name” at the Associated Press

For subscribers to The Washington Post, the article is also available on The Washington Post website

For more about the history of royal baby names, see my book Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting

Daily Express Interview: The Royal Tradition of Hiring Nannies

I discussed royal parenting and royal nannies with Kat Hopps at the Daily Express. With the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s baby expected to arrive in within weeks, there is widespread speculation in the British press concerning the childcare arrangements. I discussed the place of grandparents in the upbringing of royal children, the role of royal nannies and compared Queen Elizabeth II’s and Queen Victoria’s approaches to guiding their extended families.

Click here to read “Meghan Markle baby: Will Meghan ditch royal tradition of hiring nannies?” in The Daily Express

Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting featured in Town and Country Magazine

My book, Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting has been featured in Town and Country Magazine as one of the best books about Queen Victoria. I’m honoured to be on such an impressive list that includes Queen Victoria: 24 Days That Changed Her Life by Lucy Worsley, Serving Victoria by Kate Hubbard, Becoming Queen Victoria by Kate Williams and Victoria the Queen by Julia Baird

Click here to read The Best Books about Queen Victoria in Town and Country Magazine

In Style Interview: Will Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Give Their Baby a Traditional Royal Name?

I discussed royal baby names with Isabel Jones at In Style. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s baby will be 7th in line to the throne and the last couple of royal children born 7th in the line of succession have received traditional names but are not named after past kings and queens. The royal baby may therefore receive a name that is somewhere between a well known royal name and the more trendy names found further down the line of succession.

Click here to read “Will Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Give Their Baby a Traditional Royal Name?” at InStyle

Good Housekeeping Interview: Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s baby: What you need to know

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex

I recently discussed the Duke and Duchess of Sussex with Good Housekeeping. The royal couple will become parents in the Spring of 2019 and the interview focused on the traditions surrounding royal births including names, titles and announcements.

Click here to read “Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s baby: What you need to know” in Good Housekeeping UK

 

BBC History Magazine Article: 7 royal babies who were once seventh in line to the throne

Triumph of the Winter Queen: Allegory of the Just, 1636, by Gerard van Honthorst, a portrait of King Charles I’s sister Queen Elizabeth of Bohemia and her children. Her 6th surviving son son John Philip was born 7th in line to the English throne in 1627.

My latest article in the BBC History Magazine is about 7 royal babies who were born 7th in line to the throne. Prince Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will become parents for the first time in the Spring of 2019. The latest royal baby will be 7th in line to the throne. From the 17th century until the present day, royal children born 7th in the line of succession have pursued a variety of interesting careers including artist, consultant, jazz music expert, military officer and King of Hanover!

Click here to read 7 Royal Babies Who Were Once 7th in Line to the Throne in the BBC History Magazine

 

Town&Country Interview: Will Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Hire a Nanny When Their Baby Is Born?

Prince Charles in St. James’ Park on his second birthday with his nanny, Mabel Anderson

On Monday October 15, Kensington Palace announced that Prince Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will become parents in the Spring of 2019. Although the arrival of the royal baby is months away, there is already speculation concerning the decisions that Harry and Meghan will make as parents, including childcare. I discussed royal nannies and how they are chosen with Town and Country magazine.

Click here to read Will Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Hire a Nanny When Their Baby Is Born? at Town and Country.

For more about how royal parents raised their children from medieval times to modern times, read my book Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting 

 

Toronto Public Library Lecture on September 19, 2018: Royal Weddings from Victoria and Albert to Harry and Meghan

George Hayter’s painting of the wedding of Queen Victoria to Prince Albert

I will delivering a lecture at Toronto Public Library, Leaside Branch on Wednesday, September 19, 2018 at 2pm about the history of Royal Weddings from Victoria and Albert to Harry and Meghan followed by the sale and signing of my most recent book Raising Royalty: 1000 Years of Royal Parenting. All are welcome.

Click here for more information