New Canadian Encyclopedia Article: Martha Black

My new article in the Historica Canada Canadian Encyclopedia is about Martha Black.

Martha Louise Black, naturalist, politician (born 24 February 1866 in Chicago, Illinois, USA; died 1 November 1957 in Whitehorse, Yukon). Martha Black joined the Klondike Gold Rush in 1898, hiking over the Chilkoot Pass. She became a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society for her research and lectures on Yukon flora. From 1935 to 1940, Black represented the Yukon in Parliament. She was the second woman elected to the Canadian House of Commons.

Click here to read my article about Martha Black in the Canadian Encyclopedia

CBC News Interview: Becoming Diana: Emma Corrin on playing the Princess of Wales in Season 4 of The Crown

In an interview with Janet Davison at CBC News, I discussed screen portrayals of Diana, Princess of Wales and the challenges that arise in fictional depictions of Diana’s life for TV and film.

Click here to read “Becoming Diana: Emma Corrin on playing the Princess of Wales in Season 4 of The Crown” at CBC News

CBC News Interview: The royals and politics: Can we ever know what they really think?

I discussed environmental advocacy by successive generations of the royal family as well as virtual royal appearances in 2020 with Janet Davison at CBC News.

Click here to read “The royals and politics: Can we ever know what they really think?” in the CBC News Royal Fascinator newsletter.

CBC News Interview: Why the Queen herself has twice delivered Canada’s speech from the throne

In an interview with Janet Davison in this week’s CBC News The Royal Fascinator newsletter, I discussed the two times that Queen Elizabeth II delivered the throne speech in Canada as well as the friendships and rivalries between royal brothers from Queen Victoria’s reign to today.

Click here to read “Why the Queen herself has twice delivered Canada’s speech from the throne” and “Royal brothers don’t always get along” at CBC News.

New Canadian Encyclopedia Article: Sylvia Stark

My new article in the Canadian Encyclopedia is about Sylvia Stark (1839-1944), a notable pioneer in the history of British Columbia. Born into enslavement, Sylvia Stark was one of more than 600 Black Americans who emigrated to British Columbia in 1858 at the invitation of Governor James Douglas. She was one of the original settlers on Salt Spring Island.

Click here to read my article about Sylvia Stark in the Canadian Encyclopedia

CTV Your Morning Interview: Is it time for Canada to remove the Queen as Head of State?

The recent news that Barbados intends to transition from a Commonwealth realm to a republic, removing the Queen as Head of State, has prompted debate concerning the future of the monarchy in other Commonwealth realms including Canada. In today’s TV interview with Lindsey Deluce on CTV’s Your Morning, I discussed the monarchy in Canada and the wider Commonwealth as well as royal finances.

Click here to watch “Is it time for Canada to remove the Queen as Head of State”

Click here to read “Could Canada follow Barbados and drop the Queen as Head of State”

Huffington Post Interview: The Monarchy in Barbados

I discussed the recent announcement that Barbados, one of sixteen Commonwealth realms where Queen Elizabeth II is Head of State, intends to transition from a constitutional monarchy to a republic in 2021, with Maija Kappler from the Huffington Post. We also discussed the monarchy in Canada and the history of the British Empire and Commonwealth.

Click here to read “Barbados Is Ditching The Queen As Head Of State. Could That Happen In Canada?” in the Huffington Post

New Canadian Encyclopedia Article: Feo Monck

My latest article in the Historica Canada Canadian Encyclopedia is about the author and viceregal hostess Feo Monck.

Feo Monck’s brother-in-law was governor general Viscount Monck, and her husband, Richard Monck, was military secretary to the governor general from 1864 to 1869. When Lady Monck was absent, she acted as the hostess for viceregal social occasions, including the ball held during the Quebec Conference of 1864. She recorded her experiences in the book, My Canadian Leaves: An Account of a Visit to Canada in 1864–1865.

Click here to my read my article about Feo Monck in the Canadian Encyclopedia

CBC News Interview: Why Harry and Meghan have a ‘long road ahead’ with Netflix

I discussed Harry and Meghan’s Netflix deal, Camilla’s charity work and the history of royal philanthropy with Janet Davison at CBC News for this week’s Royal Fascinator newsletter.

Click here to read “Why Harry and Meghan have a ‘long road ahead’ with Netflix” at CBC News

New Canadian Encyclopedia Article: Anna Leonowens

My new article in the Historica Canadian Canadian Encyclopedia is about Anna Leonowens, an educator, author and lecturer who became famous as the British governess to the wives and children of King Mongkut (Rama IV) of Siam (now Thailand) in the 1860s. After leaving Siam, she emigrated to Canada, where she advocated for women’s suffrage, taught at McGill University and helped found what is now the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. She was the inspiration for Margaret Landon’s historical novel, Anna and the King of Siam (1944), and the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The King and I (1951).

Click here to read my article about Anna Leonowens in the Canadian Encyclopedia